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Kate Middleton pregnancy Announcement

Congratulations to Kate Middleton and Prince William on their newly announced expectancy of their first child! As anammonia-free hair color manufactured in the UK, this is exciting news for our company and country.

Most expected mothers, once given the exciting news of their pregnancy, began to ponder how their own personal lifestyle choices will change or improve to ensure a happy, healthy newborn. Many of these changes include what the mother-to-be puts in and on her body, and this of course, is not limited to her beauty routine.

Pregnancy and Hair Color

One of the most common concerns from expected mothers is, “How will I effectively cover my grey, or keep up with my desired hair color for the next 9 months?” The real answer is: consult your physician!

On that note, we asked on-staff doctor, Dr. Mazer, what his thoughts are on pregnancy and hair color. His reply: “Consider waiting through the first trimester to receive chemical services, but if you insist on coloring your hair, use a color such as, Organic Color Systems, which contains more natural, safer ingredients than other permanent hair colors on the market today.” Dr. Stephen Mazer has been a practicing and consulting physician in both government and the private sector for over 40 years.

Why should you be concerned about Hair Color & Pregnancy?

Nitrosamine
In 2005, the University of North Carolina conducted a study suggesting a link between neuroplastoma (cancer) in offpsring of mother’s who used permanent, semi and temporary hair color at home or in a salon. While evidence was deemed inconclusive regarding potential human carcinogenicity of specific hair dyes, common ingredients in hair dyes are aromatic amines, which are precursors of nitrosamines [3, 5]. Some nitrosamines, such as in tobacco smoke and beer, are known carcinogens [2, 4].
Organic Color Systems does NOT contain Nitrosamines.

parabens & Hair Color


Parabens are common, inexpensive preservatives found in many beauty products, and have been found to mimic estrogen in the body – this can be a huge concern for pregnant women who are already dealing with a bodily hormone changes or are planning to breast feed their children. Denmark has already banned the use of parabensin children’s products, and the EU is well on their way to replicating this safety measure.

In January of 2012, a team of research scientists at the University of Reading in the UK, found an astounding correlation between parabens and breast cancer. In fact, in virtually all tissue samples collected, 99% of breast cancer tissues contained at least 1 paraben, and 60% had at least 5 parabens [1].
Organic Color Systems does not contain Parabens.

Hair Color allergies & Pregnancy
During this special time, pregnancy can cause the body to react in unpredictable ways. With that, it is always advised that before the hair is dyed, a skin patch test is given to avoid contact with unwanted Allergies that could cause complications during pregnancy.

Scent Sensitivity & Pregnancy
As previously stated, the body will act in unexpected ways during pregnancy. A common trait is a sensitivity to smells that may not have bothered a pregnant woman previously. Our solution is simple, use a a hair color and product line that does not contain the harsh smell of chemicals and synthetic fragrance. When coloring a pregnant client’s hair, always proceed with caution, and give them the option of wearing a mask if they are sensitive even to natural smells.

Note: Ammonia is a known irritant of the skin, eyes and respiratory system, and can cause unforeseen asthmatic issues in pregnant women, and non-pregnant individuals alike – we recommend seeking a hair color line absent of this chemical.
Organic Color Systems is AMMONIA-FREE

[Sources]

1. Barr1, L., Metaxas1, G., Darbre, P., Savoy, L.A, University of Reading (2012) Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum: Volume 32, Issue 3, pages 219–232

2. Carey FA (1996) Organic Chemistry, 3rd edn. McGraw-Hill:
University of Virginia. pp. 927–928

3. Holly EA, Bracci PM, Hong MK, Mueller BA, Preston-Martin
S (2002) West Coast study of childhood brain tumours and
maternal use of hair-colouring products. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 16: 226–235

4. International Agency for Research on Cancer (1993) Occupational
Exposures of Hairdressers and Barbers and Personal Use of Hair
Colourants; Some Hair Dyes, Cosmetic Colourants, Industrial
Dyestuffs and Aromatic Amines. Lyon, France: International
Agency for Research on Cancer, pp. 43–53, 63–64, 93–94, 129–212.

5. Lijinsky W (1999) N-Nitroso compounds in the diet. Mutat Res
443: 129–138.

6. Barr1, L., Metaxas1, G., Darbre, P., Savoy, L.A, University of Reading (2012) Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum: Volume 32, Issue 3, pages 219–232





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